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Photoshop Tutorial: How to Make an Old West, WANTED Poster

December 10, 2019


Hi. This is Marty from Blue Lightning TV.
I’m going to show you how to create your own vintage, Wanted poster from the “wild west”.
This tutorial is an update to one I did on an earlier version of Photoshop. I provided
this template, so you can follow along. Its link is located in the video description or
project files. It includes a weathered, wood plank background…the base for our poster…distressed,
paper texture…four, antique nail heads…ornamental borders and a cartouche. In addition, I provided
links to the fonts that I’ll be using in this video. To make the white disappear that
surrounds the cartouche, change the Blend Mode to Multiply. Reduce its opacity to 80%.
Make the “Borders” layer active and reduce its opacity also to 80%. Make the “Nail head” layer active. Click the “fx” icon
and click Bevel Emboss. The Style is Inner Bevel, the Technique: Smooth and the Depth
is 100%. The Direction is Up and the Size is 2 pixels. Uncheck Global Light, make the
Angle minus 40 degrees and keep the Angle: 30 degrees. Make the Highlight Mode: Linear
Dodge and the Opacity: 30%. Make the Shadow’s opacity: 0. Click Drop Shadow. Change the
Blend Mode to Linear Burn and its Opacity: 40%. Make sure “Global Light” is checked and
make the Angle: 135 degrees. Make the Distance: 3 pixels and the Size: 5 pixels. Then, click
OK. Make the paper texture active, change its Blend Mode to Multiply and reduce its opacity to 85%. Make the Base layer active and double-click an empty area of the layer
to open its Layer Style window. Click Bevel & Emboss. Make the Size: 3 pixels and the
Highlight opacity: 50%. Change the Shadow’s blend mode to Linear Burn and its opacity
to 50%, as well. Click Inner Glow. Click the color box and pick Black. Then, click OK. Change
the Blend Mode to Color Burn and its Opacity to 60%. Make the Noise: 20% and the Size:
68 pixels. Then, click OK. Next, we’ll add the photo. To save space in the Layers panel,
click the small, black triangles next to the “fx” icons to collapse the effects. The effects
are still there; they’re just hidden from view. Make the Cartouche layer active. Above
this layer, we’ll place our photo. First, open your Rectangular Marquee Tool and drag
a rectangular selection centered between the borders. Open a photo you’d like to place
into your Wanted poster. I downloaded this one from Shutterstock.com. To get it into
your Wanted poster, press “v” to open your Move Tool and drag it up onto the tab of the
poster. Without releasing your computer mouse or pen, drag it down onto the image and release. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask of the selection next to your photo. Think of the layer mask as a stencil. The white area reveals the image, while the black
masks it out. To reposition and resize your photo, click off the chain link between the
photo and the layer mask. Now, we can reposition or resize either the photo or the layer mask
independently of each other. Since we want to reposition the photo, make the photo active.
Drag it to a position you like. If you want to resize it, press Ctrl or Cmd + T to open
your Transform Tool. Go to a corner and when you see a diagonal, double-arrow, press and
hold Alt or Option + Shift as you drag it in or out. Position the face, then press Enteror Return. Next, we’ll colorize it, add grain and adjust its brightness and contrast.. Double-click
the thumbnail of your photo to open its Layer Style window. Click Color Overlay and the
color box. Type in D7BF96. Then, click OK. Change the Blend Mode to Color and click OK. Go to Filter and Filter Gallery. Open the Texture folder and click Grain. Make the Grain
Type: “Enlarged”. I’m using 25 for the Intensity and 50 for the Contrast, however, depending
on the characteristics of your photo, you may want to adjust theses amounts until your
photo looks similar to this. Then, click OK. If there are areas of your photo that are
brighter than the paper, we need to darken them. Click the Adjustment Layer icon and
click Levels. Click the Clipping Mask icon to clip or restrict the Levels adjustment
layer to effect just the one layer beneath it in the Layers panel. For this photo, I’ll
brighten the Input Midtones to 1.48. Keep in mind, for your photo, you may want to use
different amounts to get the combination of brightness and contrast that looks good to
you. I’ll darken the Output highlights until the brightest areas of the photo match the
brightness of the paper. To make the black areas a bit less dense, I’ll drag the Output
Shadows a bit to the right. To consolidate more space in the Layers panel, group the face and its adjustment layer into a folder. To do this, Shift-click on the thumbnail of
the face to highlight both layers. Then, press Ctrl or Cmd + G. Let’s name it “Face”. Group
the paper texture and the base into a folder using the same steps and name it “Paper”.
Make the Face folder active to place our text above it. Open your Horizontal Type Tool and
go to Window and Character. The Character panel will open. For the word “Wanted”, I’ll
use “Regulators Condensed”. If you want to use the same fonts as I’m using, open it and
click on the font. Make the size: 70 points and make sure its Horizontal & Vertical Scales
are 100%. Click on your document and type “Wanted”. To reposition it, open your Move
Tool and move it. Click below the word and for next text, choose “The Dead Saloon Regular”.
For the Vertical Scale, type in 48 to squeeze the text vertically and type the word “DEAD”.
Press the Space bar three times and type the word, “ALIVE”. We pressed the Space bar to
make room between the two words for the word “OR”. To resize it, click the Move Tool and
open your Transform Tool. Go to a corner, press and hold Alt or Option + Shift and drag
it in until it’s approximately the same width as the word, “Wanted”. Then, center it and
press Enter or Return. Press “T” to open your Type Tool and click below the cartouche. Type
the word, “OR”. Click the Move Tool and open your Transform Tool. Go to the middle,
right side of your Transform and press and hold Ctrl + Alt + Shift on Windows or Cmd
+ Option + Shift on a Mac as you drag the Transform up to skew it from its center anchor
point. Then, reduce its size and position it to fit comfortably between the words, “Dead”
and “Alive”. Open your Type Tool and click below the cartouche. In this area, we’ll type
in a name. For this example, I’ll make the Vertical Scale: 100%, the Horizontal Scale:
170 and the Size: 21 points. For your name, play with these amounts to fit your text comfortably.
Press Enter or Return and type out your text. Open your Move Tool to center it. Open your Type Tool and click below your photo. In this area, we’ll type in the reward. For the font,
I’ll use “Saddlebag Regular”. I’ll make its Size: 46 points and its Horizontal Scale:
44%. Press Enter or Return and type out your text. As before, open your Move Tool to center it. Let’s group all the text into its own folder using the same steps as you used earlier. Let’s name the folder, “Text”. Reduce the opacity to 90%. Now, all the text that’s inside
the folder has an opacity of 90%. We can close the Character panel, now. Next, we’ll add scratches to the poster. First, let’s group the text, face, cartouche and borders into
one folder, since these are the elements that we’ll be adding scratches to. Use the same
steps as you used earlier. Click the Layer Mask icon to make a layer mask next to the folder. We’ll be adding scratches to the layer mask, which will reveal the background through
the scratches. Open your Brush Tool and open your brush thumbnails. Click the gear icon
to open your list of Brush Presets. I included “Marks and scratches” for you to download
into your Brush Preset folder. If your not sure how to install brushes into Photoshop,
watch my tutorial showing how to do this. When you see this window, click OK to replace
the current set of brushes with Marks and Scratches. To make the thumbnails appear bigger,
click the gear icon and click, “Large Thumbnail”. You can try the various scratches, however,
I’ll click the first one and make its size 1700 pixels. Move your brush over your poster
and left-click on your mouse or pen. If you don’t like the position of the scratches,
undo it by pressing Ctrl or Cmd + Z. Once you’ve added your scratches, click the Move Tool to make your cursor easier to see. Click off the eyeball of the background to temporarily
hide the layer. We’ll make a composite snapshot of just your poster by pressing Ctrl + Shift
+ Alt + E on Windows or Cmd + Shift + Option + E on a Mac. Since we have the composite
snapshot, we can hide its source layers. Next, we’ll add a drop shadow to the poster. Double-click
on an empty area of the poster layer to open its Layer Style window. Click Drop Shadow.
Change the Blend Mode to Linear Burn and make the Opacity: 25%. Make the Distance: 8 pixels
and the Size: 10 pixels. Then, click OK. Make the Background visible and open your Transform
Tool. Click the “Warp” icon. This divides your Transform into sections that can be manipulated to warp the shape under it. Place your cursor on the middle of the top line and drag it in a little. Repeat this on the middle of the right side, the middle of the left side
and middle of the bottom line. Then, press Enter or Return. This is Marty from Blue Lightning
TV. Thanks for watching!

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